Rue de la Paix – the most fashionable shopping street in Paris

The rue de la Paix (Peace Street) is the most fashionable shopping street in the center of Paris (France). Located in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris, running north from Place Vendôme and ending at the Opéra Garnier, it is best known for its jewellers, such as the shop opened by Cartier in 1898. Charles Frederick Worth was the first to open a couture house in the rue de la Paix. Many buildings on the street are inspired in design by the hôtels particuliers of Place Vendôme.

The rue de la Paix is the most expensive property in the French version of Monopoly – the equivalent to “Boardwalk” in the American version, or “Mayfair” in the UK version. In real life, the average price per square meter in 2023 is estimated at more than 18,000 euros.

Main attractions

No. 1: the haute couture house Madame Grès was located at 1, rue de la Paix from 1942 to 1988.

No. 2: the musician Jean-Paul Martini died there on February 14, 1816.

No. 3: building from 1854, built by the architects Mesnard and Rouillère. The Paquin haute couture house was established at 3, rue de la Paix in 1891.

No 4: the architect-decorator Louis Süe (1875-1968) created here with André Mare the jewelry-goldsmith store of Robert Linzeler (1872-1941), in 1923.

No. 6: the goldsmith Louis Aucoc opened his shop on rue de la Paix in 1821. He is mentioned in the first chapter of La Dame aux camélias.

No. 7: Charles Frederick Worth created his haute couture house there in 1858.

No. 8: under the reign of Louis-Philippe and the Second Empire, location of the Mirabeau furnished hotel and the publisher Amyot’s store. The current building dates from 1867, when it was rebuilt. In 1927, the perfumer Roger & Gallet had the front of his store made of Lap (aluminous cement).

No. 9: location of the Mellerio jewelry store, “the oldest house on Rue de la Paix” according to Le Figaro.

Nos. 11 and 13: location of the Cartier jewelry store (at 13 since 1899, at 11 since 1912).

No 13: location of the Westminster Paris hotel.

No. 14: building built in 1907 for the Vever jewelry company.

No. 17: location of the Carême confectionery-pastry shop in 1830 and, in 1923, of the Orsay perfumery, built by the decorative architect Louis Süe and his associates, the painter André Mare and the artistic ironworker Richard Georges Desvallières.

No. 19: here was the jeweler Gustave Baugrand (1826-1870), protector of the actress Marie Delaporte (1838-1910) and supplier to Napoleon III. Also location of the Grenoville luxury perfumery, from 1902.

No. 20: location of the novelty store À la belle Anglaise, opened in 1824, which subsequently became the furnished Hôtel de Hollande, then the Richard Hudnut perfume house, among others. Maison Maquet occupied this location from 1841 to 1846, then moved to number 24 from 1847 to 1867, and finally number 10 from 1868, where it remained for a hundred years.

No. 21: location of a room where N. Kaufmann, a German musician originally from Dresden, performed his inventions around 1817 during musical evenings: the belloneon, the cordaulodion, the harmonicord and the double-tone automaton-trumpet. The building then became, around 1824, the Doucet house, specializing in the sale of men’s lingerie and ladies’ frivolities.

No 22: location of the furnished hotel in the British Isles in 1860.

No 23: location of the Caroline Reboux fashion house.

No 25: location of the Dover Furnished Hotel in 1862.

Based in the center of Paris, the street can be reached by:

Paris metro: line 1
or buses: 72.

See more:

20 arrondissements of Paris

Architecture of Paris

Museums of Paris

Entertainment in Paris

Bridges in Paris

Parks in Paris

Streets and squares in Paris

Shopping in Paris

Transport in Paris

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